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Honduras Factory Working Conditions: To Save Time, Korean Immigrant Workers Are Forced To Wear Diapers [VIDEO]

Korean immigrant factory workers in Honduras are being forced to wear diapers.
Image YouTube/ Obligan a empleados a

UPDATE: Did Honduras Factory Workers Choose To Wear Diapers? Factory says so...

It's no secret that factory workers typically have poor working conditions internationally, as workers have unfair wages, no benefits, unreasonable hours, and are subjected to verbal, physical and sexual abuse. Many people incorrectly try to validate poor working conditions stating that stronger labor laws will increase the prices of products commonly made in sweatshops (i.e. shoes, clothing, rugs, coffee, chocolates and toys), but a study found that doubling the salary of workers would only increase the cost of an item by 1.8 percent.

That said, one factory in Honduras takes subpar working conditions to a new level by forcing its workers to wear diapers for the sake of efficiency. According to El Horizonte, authorities are investigating a factory that builds harnesses to export to the United States for human rights violations. The factory reportedly forces its workers -- Korean immigrants -- to wear diapers so that they do not waste time to go to the bathroom.

The complaint was filed by Daniel Durón, the general secretary of the General Confederation of Workers of Honduras, against Korean-owned Honduras Electrical Distribution Systems Kyungshin Lear. Durón explained on television that he has known for months of the poor working situation, but was unable to enter the premises of the factory until receiving clearance from human rights organizations and the United States since the company did not allow them access. After contacting the embassies of Korea and the United States in Honduras, he was given permission to check out the factory. Upon visiting the company, which has 4,000 workers, he was able to verify the claims that the employees were not allowed access to a bathroom.

What do you think?
Susmita  Baral

Susmita Baral joined Latin Times in April 2013. Her work has been published in VICE, Weight Watchers Magazine, Unique Homes Magazine, US Airways Magazine, Vista Magazine, Daily Glow and Kaplan. She holds a B.A. Psychology from Rutgers University. A self-proclaimed foodie, Susmita is a freelance list maker, part-time Shaq devotee, and a full-time eyeliner junkie who believes mac and cheese is a birthright.

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