Amelia Earhart's plane may have been finally found in 2013. A group which has been investigating the disappearance of the 20th Century American icon believes they may have found her final resting place. TIGHAR, The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, captured SONAR images that may point to the possibility that Earhart landed a few hundred miles off course near the archipelago republic of Kiribati, also called the Gilbert Islands.

An "anomaly" presented itself on SONAR images of the Pacific Ocean floor near uninhabited Nikumaroro Island. A "narrow object" approximately 22 feet long rests near the bottom of an underwater cliff. Oriented southwest-northeast, the image shows the "anomaly" pointed higher on its southwest end.

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When Amelia Earhart disappeared on July 2, 1937, she was in the process of a record breaking solo trip around the world at the Earth's equator. Destined at the time for a pitstop on Howland Island, Earhart and co-pilot Fred Noonan was never heard from again. Official reports from TIGHAR from the early 2000s show that the group investigated the once-inhabited but now-deserted island of Nikumaroro in the South Pacific, in hopes of finding clues to Earhart's disappearance. Due to the lack of freshwater, the remote island and its lagoon were periodically inhabited at times, but it has long since been abandoned.

In 2012, a small debris field was found 200 feet down in that area of the ocean.

TIGHAR's executive director, Ric Gillespie surmise that Earhart "made a safe landing" on the reef surrounding the island, and that the plane sank into to the Pacific, trapping her on the heavily foliaged island.

However, in order to confirm that the new "anomaly" is indeed the fuselage of her plane, TIGHAR would need to spend $3 million on another expedition.