In the first quarter of 2014 allegations of sexual abuse against minors in Mexico increased 73 percent, compared to 2013, according to data from 24 states, according to research. Last year five thousand 736 complaints were recorded, but in the first three months of 2014 there have been two thousand 216, almost half of all the 2013 allegations. Because federal authorities lack a diagnosis on the incidence of child rape, Mexican states responded to a questionnaire on the topic through their transparency portals. 

Luis García, from the National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) explained that in 2012 five out of 10 children suffered some form of violence, and in 2013 the rate was seven out of 10. "What will happen when there are 10 out of 10?" question. The maelstrom of sexual violence against children has grown relentlessly in family and school environments, he warned. For experts, the lack of a national reporting on cases of violation of children is "a serious omission."

Data samples do not exist in the Attorney General's Office, Ministry of Health or the National System for Integral Family Development (DIF); Elva Cardenas, director of Child Protection of the latter body, recognizes that there is still no diagnosis, but said they are working to have one by the end of the year. Laura Martinez, director of the Association for the Integral Development of Rape Victims, argues that "child rape is increasing every year. We see it in the control of the interviews we do."