In an era of fake news, Instagram filters, diet fads, and short-lived trends – real is rare, especially when it comes to the realities of taboo health topics like unexpected pee leaks. That's why Poise brand is partnering with Busy Philipps to launch It Takes Poise – a campaign aimed at sparking honest conversations to help demystify leaks, banish bladder leakage insecurity, combat isolation through community and ensure access to the right solutions. 

As the number one brand dedicated to bladder leakage solutions, Poise is working with Philipps to candidly address the not-so-glamorous aspects of womanhood. By encouraging women to seek knowledge and product solutions, Poise hopes women will feel inspired to take matters into their own hands.

"In reducing the stigma associated with bladder leakage conversation, we hope to foster knowledge around the topic and ultimately help women better understand bladder leaks – what they are and why they happen," said Sarah Paulsen, creative and design director for Kimberly-Clark's North American feminine-care brands. "We're doing this by partnering with other trailblazers, like Busy Philipps, and by aligning ourselves with like-minded partners, like the Association of National Advertiser's (ANA) SeeHer, the industry's leading global movement to increase accurate portrayals of women and girls in advertising, marketing, media, and entertainment."

Poise is committed to starving societal stigmas and breaking down conversational barriers – not only through partnerships but through grassroots efforts as well. Over the next five years, Poise will invest $1 million in like-minded initiatives combatting unfair norms for women, supporting them with both funding and exposure.

"Kimberly-Clark has been a member of SeeHer since it launched in 2016. Our goal is to build upon that relationship and work side-by-side to support women in all aspects of life, including when it comes to managing bladder leakage," said Paulsen.

To help further demystify the topic, Poise brand is using a yellow liquid to represent urine in TV and print ad spots to realistically address bladder leakage and normalize the conversation around the issue, given that it is a part of life for 1 in 3 women.