There's nothing more astounding than people who think outside the box and get their creative juices flowing. That's the case with Ketom, a musical group from Nicaragua, where its band members are school-aged children making music with every day objects. 

The talented group of kids from the capital Managua are taking the Central American country by storm with their rhythmic cumbia and folklore songs. But they're not just any group of kids who can play a tune. The essence of Ketom is found in their instruments, which are not only very colorful, but also made out of recycled objects. Garbage cans as drums, chanclas as drumsticks and glass bottles as marimbas, are some of the recycled instruments that this innovative group uses. 

Ketom is part of the non-profit organization "Musica Para Vivir: Assocacion Judit Ribas," which pays tribute to a late Andorra-born music teacher, Judit Ribas, who lived in Nicaragua and whose biggest dream was to create a music school for children and adolescents. Her idea of the facility was to keep kids away from delinquency and off the streets. 

"Musica para Vivir" was born in 2011 thanks to friends and family of Ribas, who have established two programs in different barrios of Managua: René Cisneros and El Recreo. The project, which is a social development through music, believes that besides being a tool for personal growth, music is also a key to social cohesion.