The 2022 World Cup is off and social media is abuzz. Unfortunately, it cannot be avoided that there are erring users who have gone on to launch racist attacks on social media and most are wondering why platforms such as Twitter are not doing anything about it.

According to researchers, black World Cup players have been targeted in tweets. But rather than act on these vicious posts, Twitter has yet to act on them despite these racist tweets being reported, Vice.com reported.

Among the world’s best soccer players targeted by these tweets include Marcus Rashford, Gabriel Jesus, Douglas Luiz, Jadon Sancho, Richarlison, Mohamed Salah and Bukayo Saka. The tweets against these players were allegedly reportedly a week ago but the social platform has not done anything to take them down.

Moreover, the accounts behind the tweets have not been sanctioned or suspended for their actions. Now, critics believe that this is because of Elon Musk’s new policy on content moderation – meaning that instead of getting rid of them, Twitter will just shrug them off.

“New Twitter policy is freedom of speech, but not freedom of reach,” Musk tweeted just 24 hours before the World Cup kicked off. “Negative/hate tweets will be max deboosted & demonetized, so no ads or other revenue to Twitter.”

Looking at the statement of Musk, it is a bit broad. He failed to define when he meant by “negative” or “hateful.” However, the mogul did add that some tweets will not be found unless it is specifically sought out, something that he feels is no different from the rest of the Internet.

Despite this, the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) still managed to find 100 tweets directing racial abuse at dozens of Black footballers who’ll be playing in the World Cup.

It is the latest issue tied to Twitter since Musk and the company took over. People were laid off and the policy changes have not exactly boded well with users and critics.

Twitter In this photo illustration, the Twitter logo is displayed on a mobile device, Nov. 7, 2013. Getty Images/Bethany Clarke