A former Navy sailor has been sentenced to 16 years to life in connection with the murder of his wife and then hiding the body for two years. The man, identified as Matthew Sullivan, stabbed his wife Elizabeth in 2014 while their kids were in another room.

Sullivan kept the body in a freezer for two years and eventually dumped it in the San Diego Bay in 2016 as he and his kids were moving out of town. It was here where authorities discovered the body of Elizabeth.

According to a report from the Los Angeles Times, San Diego County Deputy District Attorney Jill Lindberg revealed during the trial that Matthew killed his wife because Elizabeth was involved with another man. She was planning to leave him and even threatened to bring their two kids as well as their more than $1,000 joint bank account.

Sullivan batted for his innocence, alleging that Elizabeth was into drugs and that she did not come how regularly. The former sailor had no previous record and served in the Navy for 8 years.

It was last year when a San Diego Superior Court jury found him guilty of second-degree murder. He was sentenced last Friday by Superior Court Judge Albert Harutunian III, the San Diego Tribune reported.

"The jury verdict and the evidence at trial made it clear that Matthew Sullivan brutally murdered his wife, methodically cleaned up the messy murder site, and then hid the body for years," Harutunian said. "He almost got away with it, but his final attempt to hide the body at the bottom of the bay failed."

During his sentencing, Sullivan said that he felt that had some defense witnesses appeared to testify for him, the verdict of the trial would have been different.

"I firmly believe their testimony would have changed the verdict in this trial," he said.

Reading between the lines, Lindberg feels that Sullivan showed no remorse and was not sorry for his actions.

"There is clearly no remorse on the defendant's part," Lindberg stated. "He thinks he could have gotten a different verdict."

Crime Scene Three men were found hanging by the neck in Mexico next to a banner signed by a criminal organization in northern Sinaloa. Photo: Getty Images