The assistant of an ICU doctor whose COVID-19 patient succumbed to the virus after allegedly being denied access to Ivermectin has been forced to leave his post amid a brewing war of words within the Republicans for promoting the horse dewormer as an unproven cure against the novel coronavirus.

Nick Lawyer claimed he had no choice but to resign as a Sanders County health official after a patient's husband blamed him for his unvaccinated wife's death, according to Raw Story.

The grieving widower had complained that Lawyer denied his wife access to Ivermectin, Hydroxychloroquine, and antibodies, which led to her demise from COVID-19.

"Had she been given the right kind of medicine that has been proven to work like Ivermectin, Hydroxychloroquine, or the antibody serum, she would be alive and well today," the man told a commissioner meeting. "I had to watch her die slowly and in agony. You and your protocols killed her just as surely as you had shot her in the head."

Lawyer somehow ultimately became the fall guy for the ICU professional treating the woman despite having no say with policies on patients and who gets what medication.

According to Stanford University scholars, there is evidence suggesting that antibodies can improve a COVID-19 patient's outcome early on in the infection. However, those already in the ICU are deemed too sick to be administered monoclonal antibodies treatment.

Meanwhile, a surge of patients at Montana hospitals forced officials to ration care, according to Dr. Shelly Harkins, chief medical officer of Helena's Saint Peter's Health.

"For the first time in my career we are at the point where not every patient in need will get the care we might wish we could give," she said last week, noting their ICU and advanced medical units are already stretched to the limit, meaning critical-care resources are at max capacity.

"Our morgue is full. For the first time in this pandemic, we face the reality that we're going to need to bring in additional morgue support," Harkins added. " What that means is a freezer truck in the parking lot."

Saint Peter's has been seeing a significant increase in demand for oxygen amid the outbreak of the Delta variant compared to the earlier COVID-19 strains and outbreaks. At the moment, even specialty drug supplies to treat COVID-19 are also running short. 

It remains unknown, however, whether the man's wife was among the patients impacted by such supply shortages.

In related news, horse owners are struggling to access equine ivermectin, which helps eliminate “many types of worms" for livestock, amid a surge in human demand for the unproven COVID-19 treatment, according to Anchorage Daily News.

A syringe of ivermectin paste may treat a horse weighing up to 1,250 pounds with pinworms, hairworms, and largemouth stomach worms issues. The drug is being stripped off vet shop shelves at an alarming rate, however, with some horse owners managing to get hold of the dewormer now complaining about higher prices due to “all this ivermectin craziness."

Some members of the Republican Party continue to promote the use of ivermectin as a treatment for COVID-19, which has resulted in a debacle between South Carolina Congressman Tom Rice and his colleagues, who have taken to social media to voice support for the drug for human use.

It comes after top officials of the Horry County Republican Party conducted a meeting to tackle Ivermectin as a COVID-19 cure, the Hill Reporter noted.  

“That the leaders of the Horry County Republican Party believe it is appropriate to advocate for medical treatment for any illness is simply insane,” Rice said. “Folks, talk to your doctor if you want medical advice.”

Rice would also note that the use of Ivermectin is against the guidance of the Center for Disease Control, the National Institute of Health, and most physicians in America.

The medical regulator only approved the drug to treat people with intestinal strongyloidiasis and onchocerciasis, which are caused by parasitic worms. Health officers have also repeatedly stressed that COVID-19 is caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus and thus, should not be treated with antiparasitics.

ivermectin According to Stanford University scholars, there is evidence suggesting that antibodies can improve a COVID-19 patient's outcome early on in the infection. However, those already in the ICU are deemed too sick to be administered monoclonal antibodies treatment. This is a representational image. Soumyabrata Roy/Getty Images