Kim Jong Un’s sister warned the United States of “a more fatal security crisis" amid a push from Washington for a U.N. condemnation of North Korea’s recent intercontinental ballistic missile test. The warning by Kim Yo Jong followed after U.S. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield told an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council that the U.S. would pass around a proposed Presidential statement that would further condemn North Korea’s banned missile launches and other activities that would supposedly destabilize the peace. 

According to ABC News, another statement was read by Thomas-Greenfield from 14 other countries that supported the movement to limit the advancement of North Korea’s weapons programs. Kim Yo Jong, North Korea’s most influential and powerful person second only to her brother, criticized the U.S. for issuing a “disgusting " joint statement together with such rabbles as Britain, France, Australia, Japan, and South Korea. Kim Yo Jong likened the U.S. to a barking dog overcome with fear, and said that North Korea would consider the U.S.-led statement as nothing more than “a wanton violation” of the DPRK’s sovereignty and a grievous political provocation.  

In a statement carried out by state media, the North Korean supreme leader's sister said the U.S. should be mindful that it will never deprive North Korea of its right to self-defense, no matter how desperate its attempts to disarm the nation are. And should the U.S. increase its efforts, “it will face a more fatal security crisis” 

The Security Council on Monday was said to be convened in response to North Korea’s recent ICBM test launch on Friday, one of many supposed provocative missile tests this year, which experts claimed to be a movement to modernize its nuclear arsenal and increase its leverage in future diplomacy. The test saw the new Hwasong-17 missile, which some believed is capable of hitting anywhere in the U.S. mainland if fired in a standard trajectory, after a successful display of steep angle launch last week.

Despite receiving numerous condemnations from other countries, North Korea still stood firm in its effort to further its nuclear weapons program with continued missile tests and believed the activities to be an exercise in its right to self-defense.

A man walks past a television screen showing a news broadcast with file footage of a North Korean missile test A man walks past a television screen showing a news broadcast with file footage of a North Korean missile test, at a railway station in Seoul on September 29, 2022. - North Korea fired two ballistic missiles on September 29, just hours after US Vice President Kamala Harris left South Korea, where she had toured the heavily-fortified Demilitarized Zone which divides the peninsula. Photo by Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images