‘Pokémon Go’ To Add More Pocket Monsters, Features In Upcoming Updates

Pokemon Go
"Pokemon Go's" upcoming update will come with new pocket monsters to catch. Getty Images/YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP

Niantic Labs founder John Hanke has dished on the upcoming updates of “Pokémon Go” this weekend.

On Sunday, Hanke was front and center at the San Diego Comic-Con stage and he spoke about the popular augmented reality (AR) mobile game’s future, Business Insider reported. 

Hanke, who helped in the creation of “Pokémon Go,” said that fans can expect the upcoming updates to roll out in the coming months. He also confirmed that Niantic will be adding more pocket monsters and elements to the virtual world of the game.

As of late, “Pokémon Go” only houses 151 creatures — the original Pokemons from the first season of the animated series. 

Aspiring Pokemon Masters attempt to catch as many creatures as they can to store in their Pokedex, according to BGR

Unfortunately, it is impossible for players to catch all 151 Pokemons unless they can afford to travel places all over the world. 

The first reason for this is the fact that some Pokemons are region-exclusive. Tauros is only found in North America, Mr. Mime is only available in Europe, Kangaskhan is exclusive to Australia and New Zealand, while Farfetch’d is only catchable in Asia.

Another reason per The Telegraph is the elusive nature of legendary Pokemons Mew, Mewtwo, Articuno, Moltres and Zapdos.

Meanwhile, Ditto remains a mystery and there is even a speculation claiming that it is actually being withheld for an upcoming expansion. 

Hanke did not specify how many Pokemons and which ones are going to be added into the “Pokémon Go” via the first update for the game.

In related news, Nintendo’s shares tumbled after the company revealed last Friday that “Pokémon Go” will only have “limited” impact on its finances. Nitendo’s stock quickly dropped 17 percent  following the announcement. Prior to that, Nintendo’s stock almost doubled before the market closed on Friday, according to Bloomberg.

 

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