With COVID-19 cases rising, health experts are scampering for ways to help address the growing coronavirus situation. Though vaccines are already available, there could be another way to keep people protected.

According to ABC 7, research is underway at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to determine if breast milk can help fight off the dreaded coronavirus. It could carry the necessary antibodies to help fight off severe cases of COVID-19.

Per Dr. Laura Ward, there is already evidence that breast milk contains antibodies that can help protect individuals dealing with lower-respiratory issues. With this in mind, it is one reason why new mothers are encouraged to breastfeed their children to protect them from the virus.

"It makes sense that breastfeeding is protective against this virus," Ward said. "I think we're just starting to come up with that evidence for sure."

However, there is also a chance that bacteria and viruses could be transferred through breast milk. This is a reason why some doctors are against breastfeeding although this is likely part of the studies that are being done right now.

"I think taking milk from a person you don't know is definitely very risky,” Jennifer McCallister, MD/ Pediatrician with Cincinnati Children's Hospital said.

As far as breast milk sharing, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine says that sharing it informally should be made to a family member or someone trusted. Some hospitals have used donated breast milk that is pasteurized and cultured to help new moms and babies in need, News 5 Cleveland reported.

Some mothers were unfortunate enough to have contracted COVID-19 such as Debbie Pappadakes. She got the virus in November but got a huge relief after learning that her baby is now getting an immune response that will serve as a layer of protection to her offspring.

"I feel really good about the fact that such a small person has been exposed and is now getting an immune response [doctors] think that hopefully will protect him if he does get exposed again," Pappadakes stated.

 In this photo illustration, Sarah Ward breast feeds her daughter Esme at home with bottles of Lewis Road Creamery 'Breast Milk' in the foreground In this photo illustration, Sarah Ward breast feeds her daughter Esme at home with bottles of Lewis Road Creamery 'Breast Milk' in the foreground Getty Images | Fiona Goodall