A prominent QAnon backer from Chicago has died from COVID-19 on Monday, sparking outrage and a coordinated harassment campaign from her supporters against a Northwest Side hospital that declined to treat her illness with a potentially dangerous horse dewormer.

Anti-vaxx activist Veronica Wolski, 64, of Jefferson Park, had been hospitalized for weeks after she contracted COVID-19 and suffered complications, according to posts on the messaging platform Telegram, HuffPost reported.

She died at the Amita Resurrection Medical Center at around 12:44 a.m. on Monday from pneumonia due to COVID-19, with hypothyroidism as a contributing factor, the Cook County medical examiner’s office confirmed. 

Wolski had been very vocal in opposing coronavirus safety measures and had denied the existence of the pandemic itself. She had called coronavirus "the smartest virus ever,” insisting that it will not affect individuals who refuse to believe in it.

She was well-known in Chicago for disseminating anti-vaccine and pro-QAnon messages via large banners in highly-trafficked areas, including the ones with pointed messages on the fence of a pedestrian bridge over the Kennedy Expressway.

Following her COVID-19 diagnosis, her backers had demanded Resurrection Medical Center treat her with the drug ivermectin, which is commonly used to deworm livestock. 

According to a QAnon flyer for a protest last Monday at the hospital, a doctor had initially agreed to administer ivermectin on Wolski but later backtracked his decision after his colleagues sided with public health experts who advised against its use for COVID-19 patients, the Chicago Sun-Times noted.

While the drug has some human applications, it is not approved as a treatment for COVID-19. The Food and Drug Administration recommended against it late in August, issuing a statement on Twitter that reads, “You are not a horse. You are not a cow. Seriously, y’all. Stop it.”

Lin Wood, a far-right attorney, had also utilized Wolski’s hospitalization to boost his publicity. He would take to social media to campaign and urge other QAnon followers to demand the hospital for Wolski to be treated with ivermectin. 

In a post on Telegram following Wolski’s death, Wood told his followers they are responsible to declare war against “medical murders.”

Soon after, hospital staff called the cops to report they received several bomb threats after hundreds of QAnon supporters began inundating the facility with calls and emails expressing threats of violence. 

Twitter moved to permanently ban Wood from the platform earlier this year after he published his predictions then-Vice President Mike Pence would be executed by a firing squad.

Meanwhile, former President Donald Trump on Monday afternoon announced the endorsement of Mark Finchem to be the next secretary of state in Arizona.

In a statement from his Save America PAC, the former top leader also noted Finchem remains his "powerful" stance on alleged voter fraud that Trump's camp is claiming to have occurred in the 2020 Presidential Election, which saw him replaced by Joe Biden. 

Finchem is expected to attend the QAnon gathering "Patriot Double Down," in Las Vegas next month as a guest speaker, according to CNN Politics. In July, the Arizonian candidate repeatedly tackled and backed conspiracy theories on fringe conservative media, including one high-profile podcast known for being a QAnon supporter. 

"We've got a serious problem in this nation. There's a lot of people involved in a pedophile network in the distribution of children. Unfortunately, there's a whole lot of elected officials that are involved in that," Finchem said in July. 

QAnon Wolski was well-known in Chicago for disseminating anti-vaccine and pro-QAnon messages via large banners in highly-trafficked areas, including the ones with pointed messages on the fence of a pedestrian bridge over the Kennedy Expressway. This is a representational image. Stephen Maturen/Getty Image