Netflix cancels the new "Sherlock Holmes" series "The Irregulars" after one season.

According to Variety, the streaming service announced the series cancellation shortly after its first season premiered in March despite its good ratings.

The week it premiered, Netflix dubbed "The Irregulars" as the most popular streaming show, with 643 million minutes viewed across all episodes.

During that time, it also outperformed its Disney Plus rival, "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier," which came in second with 628 million minutes streamed.

The series earned a 78% critical approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

Here's what Daniel D’Addario wrote in  his review for  Variety :

“For all that we’re told these kids are special, they confront their duty with a sense of glum obligation; there’s little of the high-stepping curiosity and possibility that is present in the best of Holmes, and that one might expect from a show in which teens attuned to voices from other worlds avert the apocalypse in Holmes’s London.”

The producers of "The Irregulars," starring Thaddea Graham, McKell David, and Harrison Osterfield, based their story on Arthur Conan Doyle's works.

It followed a group of teenagers who were duped into solving crimes for Doctor Watson and his enigmatic sidekick, Sherlock Holmes.

Comingsoon.net  said Watership Down's Tom Bidwell wrote and executive produced the drama, with Greg Brenman also acting as an executive producer. The series was also produced by Rebecca Hodgson, with episodes directed by Johnny Allan, Joss Agnew and Weronika Tofilska.

IGN  said Netflix has a history of canceling shows after one or two seasons. However, it began with multi-season series like "House of Cards" and "Orange Is the New Black." With too much material to sell, the streaming service is less lenient when it comes to allowing shows a chance to expand if they don't become huge hits like "Stranger Things" or "The Witcher."

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