A woman with a rare eating disorder tried to eat a 3-feet-long iPhone charger cable and had to undergo emergency surgery to extract the charger cable.

The woman, an anonymous Polish woman who suffers from Pica, a rare eating disorder where people try to eat inedible objects, tried to eat a 3-feet-long iPhone charger cable. After she tried to eat the charger cable, the cable reportedly got stuck in her esophagus after which she experienced shortness of breath and was taken into surgery, NY Breaking reported.

The woman only called rescuers for help after she experienced shortness of breath due to the placement of the upper part of the tube in her esophagus. The woman underwent an operation and the charger cable was successfully removed from her body. She was released from the ER after the operation.

The incident came to light after a group called ‘Ready to Rescue’ that teaches first aid in the Polish city of Wroclaw posted an X-ray picture on Facebook, Daily Mail reported.

‘The case presents a woman who swallowed a meter-long charging (power) cable,’ the caption of the photo read.

The photo of the incident was originally posted on the social media page of a group calling itself Savage Paramedics. The group Savage Paramedics describes itself as ‘a community for healthcare professionals coming together for humour, entertainment, and education.'

‘The umbilical cord was successfully removed at the hospital and she has made a full recovery,' the group then posted. The post went viral in a short span of time and has since received over 12000 likes and comments.

‘But she didn’t tell anyone the reason for initially swallowing the charging cable.'

‘Any idea?’ the group asked.

‘She wanted to feel more connected,’ one joked in the comments.

‘Maybe he needed a recharge,' another person wrote.

Meanwhile, others highlighted the seriousness of women’s eating disorders in the comments. 

‘Pica behavior. I used to work in a mental institution, and we had a lot of these. Bra hooks, nails, hinges, brass tube ends, staples, paper clips, nail clippers, cupboard handles, utensils. You name it,’ one person wrote.

Pica disorder is often associated with the consumption of substances that have no significant nutritional value such as soap, paint, wood, or stones. The term Pica disorder comes from the medieval Latin word for magpie because of its opportunistic feeding behaviors.